Tag Archives: seed beads

Learn and Master Spiral Stitch

This year, I’m focusing on individual stitches by releasing tutorial packages featuring four projects using the same stitch – but in different ways. The first package, which is available as of today, is for Spiral Stitch. This is aimed at beading beginners, experienced beaders who have never tried spiral, or beaders who want to extend their spiral techniques.

In this package, you will learn basic spiral stitch, double spiral, how to create a V in a spiral stitch rope for a necklace, and also how to do Flat Spiral.  This tutorial uses photographs and diagrams, as well as clear, written instructions.

Find it in store here!

 

Advertisements

Provoquant

CRAW is such a marvelous stitch. It has such a wonderful texture and is strong and robust without being too heavy. It’s also a perfect for bezelling (I don’t think this is a real word, but it should be, and it should be a broad definition: bezelling, adj. the act of creating a cozy aesthetic nook for something beautiful) around any shape.

In my latest piece, Provoquant, I have bezelled two Swarovski Light Vitrail rivoli and one gorgeous Astral Pink pear. The rope is also CRAW stitched, left mostly unembellished with faux end-caps. If you would like to learn this wonderful stitch, you can find a free tutorial here. I promise, it will open up a whole new world of possibilities.

img_20160909_201158-3img_20160909_200947-2

New Creations

I haven’t blogged since January, but I have been doing a little bit of beading in amongst the chaos of my life.  Starting with a beautiful Heliotrope rivoli, bezelled with gold and peacock seed beads and Swarovski bicones. I stitched a delicate chain of gold seed beads in Right Angle Weave, double-woven for a more uniform look, to create a gorgeous necklace.

2016-01-09 15.02.48.jpg

Later I used the same design to create my Nymph earrings, which are now available as a tutorial through my Etsy store.

20160202_114832.jpg

Next up I made a hair pin as a gift for a friend. I based the design on an oriental lily, in cream and gold, with ruffled edges. For the centre, I used a filigree bead cap, splayed open with a pearl.

20160308_135735.jpg

I have lots of ideas floating around in my head, but I need more hours in the day to make them manifest. Stay tuned.

Happy (belated) New Year

Phew what a year! It was one of my busiest, but one of my least productive jewellery-wise, with my world being all topsy-turvy.  I have much to be grateful for, including the support that I have received from members of this amazing international network of beaders. I love the way we rally around each other in times of struggle, boosting each others sales to help through the hard times.  In 2015, beaders helped me get back on my feet after my separation, and also helped to pay for Kranky-cat’s ear surgery, thank you all. I hope 2016 will bring more opportunities to create.

20151212_191659.jpg

The weaving has been slow, but I have managed to complete two new necklaces that were custom ordered. My lovely customer already owns a necklace that I made years ago, featuring one of these lovely resin roses in red. When she discovered that I had black and ivory in my stash as well, she couldn’t resist.

20160102_181205.jpg

The ivory necklace is made with Toho seed beads in chenille stitch. To allow the bead work to fit through the narrow bail on the pendant, I used a bead-quilling technique with 15/0 seed beads. The black necklace features Czech seed beads in a variation of a filled net weave.

Wishing you all a fantastic year full of art and inspiration.

 

Still Chugging

You could be forgiven for thinking that I’d fallen off the grid, it has, after all been five weeks since my last post. I promise, I have been here, chugging along in the background. Those of you who follow me on Facebook, will know that I’ve been working on a new Harlequin Bangle and tutorial. Those of you who don’t follow me on Facebook, shame on you!

I kid, of course, I still love you.

011

The bangle is now done, but the tutorial still has a fair bit of work, plus proofing, left to be done. It’s been the most challenging tutorial I’ve taken on, but I think I’ve managed to convey the ideas clearly. I’ve also learned some new tricks in Inkscape which will come in handy in future tutorials. I’m indebted to Kate McKinnon (yes, her again, I know I’m a ridiculous fan-girl), for giving me the all-clear to shamelessly plagiarise her techniques. It’s this generosity and collective-brain ideal that has turned CGB in to an almost sentient beast.

011

Being part of the CGB readership is almost like being a part of a hive-mind. There’s so many ideas in my head, I couldn’t possibly try them all;  but then I don’t need to, because every time I think “what if I done this?” I see that someone has already tried it. We have become a community. We learn from each others mistakes and successes. We encourage each other to try new things. We freely share our ideas without the guarded jealously to prevalent in the art world. When comments such as “I’m going to try this” are left under images of our work, we don’t bellow “Copyright Infringement!!”, we say “Yes!! Here are some tips and a list of the colours I used.”

It’s been a wonderful ride, long may it continue.

What’s the point of MRAW?

“Is there any point to an MRAW band in Geometric Beadwork?” This was a search term that someone used to get to my blog. This question refers to Kate McKinnon’s genius Modified Right Angle Weave Bellyband as seen in her Contemporary Geometric Beadwork book series. The simple answer is “ABSOLUTELY!”, but I will elaborate…

The MRAW band is used as a starting point for many of the structures in CGB. It is, in simple terms, a right angle weave strip with a row of peyote added in a single pass. It is a time consuming element, and if one was uncomfortable with it, there is no reason one couldn’t simply make a band of RAW and add the peyote row afterwards, or even eliminate the RAW section and just do a peyote start – however there is a definite advantage to using MRAW instead: structural integrity. mrawThis wonderful thread path, locks the peyote teeth in place and ensures a much more even distribution of your RAW beads. But it’s so much more than that.

MRAW vs Peyote start
A peyote start can be tricky at the best of times. It involves stringing on all of the beads of your first two rows, then adding the third row in an alternating pattern to pull the beads into the staggered, ‘toothed’ pattern we are familiar with. This start creates a problem with tension; the first rows will be tighter that the rest of the work. In smaller scale pieces, this tension difference may be so slight, that it will go unnoticed. However, the larger the width of peyote, the more compounded this problem will be. Many of the pieces in CGB are hundreds of beads wide, if you manage a peyote start without breaking beads towards the end of the third row, the tension variation will still create unsightly undulations of your “fabric”, instead of a sleek, smooth surface.

Progress photos highlighting the important role the the MRAW Belly-band in a Fortuneteller

Progress photos highlighting the important role of the MRAW Belly-band in a Fortuneteller

An MRAW band start ensures a gentle tension right from the get-go, as it creates the teeth of the first peyote row for you. It also gives you extra options as to how to build off it, whether you add it as a design feature in the middle of a cuff, or as a functional base for a layered piece, adding strength and structure to your design. In some of your designs, you may not wish to include the MRAW Belly-Band, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still use it to your full advantage. Let me direct you to Kate’s ingenious “Exploding Round”. I can’t tell you how much I love this concept, I used it in my Harlequin Bangles because I wanted an uninterrupted flowing pattern. The best part is the same Belly-Band can be used again and again for an easy start.

hotcold

Harlequin Bangles, worked off the same Removable MRAW Belly-Band

So while the MRAW start may not be the only way to start, it is the only start I’d recommend to someone working on Rick-Racks, Fortunetellers and their Winged and Horned friends.

Omigosh A Sale!

Who doesn’t love a good sale, huh?  With Christmas quickly approaching, we could all use a good bargain, and what better gift than a unique one of a kind piece of jewellery! Every item (excluding tutorials) has been significantly reduced to clear the way for fresh stock in the New Year. Have a browse in store here.

Silver and Turquoise Mailye Necklace with Swarovski Crystals, on sale now!

Silver and Turquoise Mailye Necklace with Swarovski Crystals, on sale now!

Looking for something a bit more personal? Order a custom piece of jewellery in your (or your loved one’s) favourite colours. All custom orders received before December 1 will also receive a free mystery gift, but get in quick, numbers are strictly limited. To enquire, email me at sales@jennysangster.co.nz or PM me on Facebook.

Custom ordered Wonder Woman Cuff

Custom ordered Wonder Woman Cuff